Association of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in papulosquamous diseases

Authors

  • Abhineetha Hosthota Department of Dermatology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research Center Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Ishwarya U. Department of Lab Medicine, NH Health City, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Anila Sara Thampi Department of Dermatology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research Center Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Supriya R. Department of Dermatology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research Center Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Chaganam Kavya Department of Dermatology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research Center Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Chandan B. C. Department of Dermatology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research Center Bangalore, Karnataka, India
  • Bhavana Venumbaka Department of Dermatology, The Oxford Medical College Hospital and Research Center Bangalore, Karnataka, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/issn.2455-4529.IntJResDermatol20231826

Keywords:

MetS, Skin diseases, Papulosquamous, Psoriasis, Lichen planus

Abstract

Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS), insulin resistance (IR) and papulosquamous diseases with shared pathophysiology leads to conglomeration of risk factors of non-communicable diseases like cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) causing high mortality worldwide. The objective is to study the association of MetS and IR in papulosquamous diseases.

Methods: It is a hospital-based case-control study conducted on 200 age-sex matched cases and controls with consent. Subjects were administered a pre-validated questionnaire, diagnosis of papulosquamous diseases was based on clinical examination and skin biopsy. MetS was diagnosed based on national cholesterol education program's- adult treatment plan iii with Asian modification for abdominal circumference criteria. Fasting serum insulin levels (FI) was used as a surrogate marker of IR. 

Results: Mean serum HDL- C level was low and statistically significant (p=0.017). Mean fasting plasma glucose level was significantly higher in patients (p=0.008). Mean FI level was significant between cases and controls (p=0.013). IR was found in 76% of cases which was significantly higher than in controls (p<0.05). IR was highest in psoriasis 29% followed by LP 22%, PRP 19%, and LS 6% which was statistically significant (p<0.05). MetS was mostly found in psoriasis (17%), LP (9%) and least in PRP, LS.

Conclusions: This study intends clinicians to do periodic MetS and IR evaluation in papulosquamous diseases. Thus, subclinical cases of non-communicable diseases can be detected and potential co-morbidities can be prevented.

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Published

2023-06-26

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Original Research Articles